6 Foods High in Cholesterol to Avoid

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Consuming some cholesterol in your diet can be perfectly safe, but because your body makes all the cholesterol you need, it’s not necessary to consume any of the foods you eat, according to the experts from https://www.acepokies.com/new-online-casinos/.

Full-fat dairy

Whole milk, butter and full-fat yogurt and cheese are high in saturated fat. Cheese also tends to be high in sodium, and most Americans get too much sodium, too. Limit cheese to about 3 ounces per week, and choose part-skim cheese such as Swiss or mozzarella when cooking. Drink skim (non-fat), 1% or 2% milk to get your calcium intake. Look for non-fat or low-fat yogurt varieties. Use extra-virgin olive oil or avocado oil instead of butter.

Red meat

Steak, beef roast, ribs, pork chops and ground beef tend to have high saturated fat and cholesterol content. Choose 90% lean ground beef, lean cuts of beef (such as sirloin, tenderloin, filet or flank steak, pork loin or tenderloin), and focus on lower-fat sources of animal protein, such as baked skinless or lean ground poultry.

Processed meat

You should limit processed meat in general because of its high sodium content and low nutrition. In fact, bacon, sausage and hot dogs are usually made from fatty cuts of beef or pork. If you must eat processed meat, choose minimally processed sausage or deli meat made from lean turkey or chicken, courtesy of best paying online casino.

Fried foods

French fries, fried chicken with skin and other foods cooked in a deep fryer have a high amount of saturated fat and cholesterol from the oil they’re cooked in. A better choice is baked chicken or turkey without the skin, baked potatoes or baked “fries” tossed with a little olive oil. Try using an air fryer for a lower-fat “fried” food taste.

Baked goods and sweets

Cookies, cakes and doughnuts usually contain butter or shortening, making them high in saturated fat and cholesterol. They also tend to be full of sugar, which can lead to high levels of blood triglycerides, an unhealthy blood fat (lipid) that can be a risk factor for coronary heart disease. Instead, make your desserts at home, choosing recipes that don’t need shortening or lots of butter. This also allows you to modify recipes and cut down the amount of sugar used, to half or three-quarters the recommended amount. You can also enjoy baked fruit as a dessert, or substitute applesauce for eggs or butter in your baking.

Shellfish

Shellfish — including clams, crab and shrimp — are an excellent source of protein, B vitamins, iron and selenium. They’re also high in cholesterol. For example, a 3-ounce (85-gram) serving of canned shrimp provides 214 mg of cholesterol. Additionally, shellfish contain bioactive components, such as carotenoid antioxidants and the amino acid taurine, which help prevent heart disease and lower LDL (bad) cholesterol.

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